THE IJ-7 CONFERENCE BLOG

Wednesday, June 16, 2010

Opening Keynote with Krishna Bharat (video)

The opening IJ-7 Keynote with Google News Creator Krishna Bharat is now available on YouTube:



Krishna Bharat, founder and engineering head of Google News, speaks with David Nordfors, Founding Executive Director of the Stanford Center for Innovation and Communication at Stanford University, at the opening keynote session of IJ-7, the Seventh Conference on Innovation Journalism, at Stanford on June 9, 2010.

The Google News Blog coverage of the chat is here: Krishna Bharat discusses the past and the future of Google News.

[Addition June 21] - here is some external coverage of the chat:

Wednesday, June 9, 2010

CNET@IJ-7: Journalism vx Intellectual Property Rights

CNET/CBS has published three videos from the IJ-7 INJO/CBS keynote panel "Journalism vs Intellectual property.

Here goes:
"Gizmodo raid: Crimefighting, or journalistic threat?"
(click here to see it on CNET's website)

A police raid of a Gizmodo editor's home as part of an investigation into Apple's missing prototype 4G iPhone raises questions about trade secrets, journalism, and the First Amendment. CNET correspondent Declan McCullagh, center, moderates panel at Stanford University's Innovation Journalism conference on June 7 asking whether Gizmodo, Apple, or law enforcement crossed the line. Panelists from left to right:Paul Saffo, technology forecaster; Roger Myers, media attorney who represented CBS Interactive in effort to unseal Gizmodo documents; Jennifer Granick, Electronic Frontier Foundation attorney; William Coats, litigator who has represented clients including Lucasfilm and DVDCCA on intellectual property cases. Introduction by David Nordfors, Executive Director InJo Stanford;

(18 min 53 sec)

"Is Wikileaks the future of journalism?"
(click here to see it on CNET's website)


Wikileaks brags that it's produced more scoops in its lifetime than the Washington Post has in 30 years: is this the future of journalism? CNET correspondent Declan McCullagh, center, asks this question at Stanford University's Innovation Journalism conference on June 7. Panelists from left to right: Paul Saffo, technology forecaster; Roger Myers, media attorney who represented CBS Interactive in effort to unseal Gizmodo documents; Jennifer Granick, Electronic Frontier Foundation attorney; William Coats, litigator who has represented clients including Lucasfilm and DVDCCA on intellectual property cases. Panel introduced by David Nordfors, Executive Director InJo Stanford;

(22 min 31 sec)

"Intellectual Property rights vs journalism"
(click here to see the video on CNET's website)
Is intellectual property protection a threat to journalism? Is journalism a threat to intellectual property protection? Audience members ask where should the borders lie at Stanford University's Innovation Journalism conference on June 7. Panelists from left to right: Paul Saffo, technology forecaster; Roger Myers, media attorney who represented CBS Interactive in effort to unseal Gizmodo documents; CNET correspondent Declan McCullagh; Jennifer Granick, Electronic Frontier Foundation attorney; William Coats, litigator who has represented clients including Lucasfilm and DVDCCA on intellectual property cases. Audience questions moderated by David Nordfors, Executive Director InJo Stanford;

(26 min 54 sec)

Tuesday, June 8, 2010

InJo Picks 2010: The Winners

Injo Pick No 1: Mark Glaser

The winners of the InJo Picks 2010 were announced today at IJ-7, the Seventh Conference on Innovation Journalism. This years' role model innovation journalists (and the Injo Fellows who nominated them) are:

Injo Pick No 1: Mark Glaser, editor of Idea Lab and PBS MediaShift, nominated by Tanja Aitamurto for his story "Why 'TV Everywhere' Will Fail".

Injo Pick No 2: Sheraz Sadiq
Injo Pick No 2: Sheraz Sadiq, Associate Producer of Quest, KQED, nominated by Matej Praprotnik for his story "Decoding Synthetic Biology; imagine living cells acting as memory devices; biofuels brewing from yeast, or a light receptor taken from algae that makes photographs on a plate of bacteria"


Injo Pick No 3: Peter Aldhous
Injo Pick No 3: Peter Aldhous, San Francisco Bureau Chief, New Scientist. Nominated by Shehryar Mufti for his story "My 'non-human' DNA: a cautionary tale;'This is a strange question, but are you sure this is Homo sapiens?' It's not every day that an expert queries whether your DNA is human, so when I received this comment by email earlier this month I was somewhat bemused."


The whole list of InJo Picks 2010 nominees and their stories are available on the IJ-7 conference website.

Thursday, June 3, 2010

Tha Shape of Things to Come

The roundtable session 'Young Peoples' InJo' is, by far, one of the most exciting projects I've been involed in. Esther Wojcicki's journalism students from Palo Alto High, collectively, are a force of nature. Between Ed Madison from the University of Oregon, Tim Dickinson from Rolling Stone, and, of course, Esther Wojcicki herself, this session promises to be an eye-opener to say the least.
We all know how powerful young people are becoming, and how central a role innovation has played in that. This is the session, however, that will show you how this shift is manifesting itself.
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